How to Save on Your Auto Insurance

auto insurance

Auto insurance companies constantly battle to claim providing the best deals, but only some actually pull through. There are many areas in your life where you can make cuts, and, believe it or not, your auto insurance is one of them.

A year after I graduated college, I had my first taste in shopping around for new auto insurance companies. I felt I was not receiving the promised rewards of my plan at the time, and despite reaching out to my representative, no changes were made. After doing some extensive shopping around, I cancelled my plan and went with a new company. This reduced my monthly payment by roughly $60. Needless to say, I was very happy I took the time to do some research.

Many individuals tend to forget to reevaluate their car insurance. They are so focused on their car and having this investment protected that savings could be easily missed, which is completely understandable. But, when working on improving your personal finances, leave no stone unturned.

Just because you already have a policy does not mean you can’t still shop around. Finding the best quotes is key to auto insurance savings. These insurance quotes from reliable companies will be the primary tool you need to leverage change in what you pay. Keep in mind that the estimates you choose should be from a comparable plan to your existing one.

So, let’s get started and get you the savings you deserve with these quick tips.

Don’t limit yourself

There is no cost to getting an auto insurance quote, so don’t limit yourself to just one. In fact, get as many as you can to really help you evaluate your options and to present these estimates to your current company. Performing a thorough research is the first step in this process, and a really important one. Ask for referrals from friends and family and consider looking on forums for advice on companies to speak with.

Dig deep and know your auto insurance needs

Referrals are great, but you still need to research the company to make sure it is a good fit for you. Know what you need in a policy. What is the companies’ coverage like? What are their policies on accidents, speeding tickets and so on? Do they offer forgiveness plans? Do they primarily work online or are they very personalized in their customer service? Knowing all the background information and fine details are important in your savings journey.

Raise your deductible and have good credit

You may need to raise your deductible in order to lower your premium. As companies begin to run quotes for you, they will also look into your credit score, so just be prepared for that. If you need to improve your credit standing, this recent article published right here on Suburban Finance may help.

Try to stick to online searches

Although agents will generally always be available to speak with you, you may be presented with additional costs to meet and talk with them. Not to mention, this will also take up a lot of your time. Try to do as many online searches as you can without speaking to an agent. Should you need to speak with someone for more details, there are some companies who do have online chats or will offer a complimentary phone call with a representative.

Bring multiple cars together

If you have more than one vehicle, consider placing them all under the same policy. This will bring you even more savings.

Overall, the goal is to weigh out your options to make sure you are getting the best deal for you and your budget. Customer service is huge for me, so when my previous auto insurance carrier failed to look into my issues with me, I decided to move on. If your company is willing to make changes to better suit your needs, they may be the best option you.

Never be afraid to look into things and ask where you can save. The answers are out there; you just have to look for them.

What tips would you add to the list? 

 

 

Are you really aware of an asset meaning?

Whether you are a numbers person or not, finances become a major part of your life as you continue to propel into adulthood. As you are consistently reminded of the importance of investments, it is also imperative to understand the difference between an asset and a liability, especially if you are making purchases with the intent to create value.

So, what is the definition and meaning of an asset?

According to Dictionary.com, an asset is “a single item of ownership having exchange value.” Google.com also defines it as “property owned by a person or company, regarded as having value and available to meet debts, commitments, or legacies.”

Of course, other definitions include a balance sheet for liabilities and capital as well as generalized to anything that is useful or valuable.

Robert Kiyosaki, American businessman, investor and self-help author, puts the description of the meaning of an asset a little more simply:

Asset Meaning

His examples include real estate, businesses that don’t require you to work at them, and stocks and bonds as mentioned in his book, “Rich Dad, Poor Dad.”

However, certain items you own can also be considered an asset, even within your own home.

Conversely, these same articles could be liabilities. Liabilities, as defined by Dictionary.com are “moneys owed; debts or pecuniary obligations.” Kiyosaki explains them as any purchase that takes money out of your pocket.

As you dive into the world of researching which of your household items put money in your pocket and which are a straight cost, you’ll need to keep these definitions in mind. A major issue is that many people believe their goods are profitable when, in reality, they are not as valuable as they think or, worse, they are a bit of a disadvantage to the consumer’s pocket.

While this can be an often confusing topic, Suburban Finance is here to help clear things up. Below are common possessions that you may not have realized were assets (or liabilities):

  • Your carSome will actually deem your vehicle a more of a liability due to the amount of expenses that go into them over time. These include gas, maintenance, insurance and a loan. A car can surely be an asset, though, if the value is greater than the amount due on it. It is also classified in such terms as it can be sold for cash; however, it continuously devalues over time, not excluding the minute you drive it off the lot. While you can add your automobile to your overall net worth, you have to also deduct the liabilities on it when doing so along with determining the depreciating value. (Equally, include all liabilities in your total net worth calculation.) Many dispute on this topic, but you need to be able to establish the worth of the vehicle (trade-in value, what you gain over time, etc.) and the expenses you will accrue.
  • Fine art. Art and other collectibles, such as antiques, can add a considerable amount to your net worth. Of course, this type of purchase does not come without research. The rarer a piece, the more valuable; but the art industry is also very erratic. This is not an easy money-maker, even though its value can be limitless. This can be also be an initial expensive investment on top of an ongoing venture, since purchasing the original will be worth more than a reproduction. If you already have some items that you believe to have value, whether a reproduction or not, you should invest to have them appraised. This will be the best way to ensure you have a strong asset in your hands. Furthermore, you should be aware of the fact that home owner’s insurance may not cover your collectibles without special coverage.
  • Furnishings and appliances. Furniture, appliances and even clothes are considered what is known as non-earning or non-financial assets. These are items you own but do not provide extra revenue. One could say that appliances could also be considered an earning asset due to their efficiency in saving you time, which creates more opportunities for you to make money. If you are purchasing certain goods with the intention of investing, such as antique furniture or collectible items, you will (as mentioned above) want to consider getting them evaluated for value. While most household goods won’t necessarily produce more income, they do still represent part of your net worth. They are also useful for cases of bankruptcy and replacement cost in your insurance policy.
  • Guns. Firearm purchases have been on the rise, particularly with the gun-control laws. These purchases include both collectibles and commercial. Many investors are anticipating tighter regulations in the near future while others are concerned of the return of the federal assault weapons ban, which means any firearms in the banned categories will be illegal to produce. Those in circulation will, though, still be able to purchased and exchange hands with a fixed supply level. These commodities are very valuable to each owner, and they tend to appreciate over time. Guns are an investment that has a price dependent upon supply and demand. While still a strong subject, guns are, indeed, considered an asset due to their steady worth. As with any asset, they would also need to be disclosed if ever filing bankruptcy.
  • Your homeWhile common thought is that your home would be measured as an asset, Kiyosaki actually considers this to be more a liability due to the time and expenses spent on maintenance, mortgage payments, insurance, the home’s devaluation and the like. It’s likely that you may not sell the home for what it is worth due to still owning on the loan when you move. Renting a room, though, can help to turn this non-earning asset into a financial gain. Also, purchasing homes with the intent to rent to others would also turn home-buying into an asset. This is, of course, depending on who you ask. In the business world, homes are typically considered more of a liability due to costs in time and money. In spite of this, most homeowners will think of their house as a strong resource due to owning the property.

In summary, what is considered an asset and liability is often debated and dependent upon whom you ask. Just remember to keep in mind financial trends and potential value in items before attempting to turn household products into money in your pocket.