Tips for Finding Your First Job After College

first job after college

Finding that first job after college can be hard. These tips can help.

Following your last finals and finally saying goodbye to college, the real world hits you pretty quick. While I am sure you can remember many late and difficult nights meeting deadlines during your studies, job hunting becomes the next big challenge in your life. Finding that first job after college can be a full-time gig in itself.

This can be a difficult time for many graduates. As employers look for experience, and you seek to obtain it, you may feel discouraged or lost as you apply. But, before you throw in the towel, here are some tips for finding your first job after college:

  • Update your resume. This may seem obvious, but you would be surprised how many recent college grads miss the mark on this one. Do a little resume audit, and make sure it is updated with recent relevant information. Include your grade point average (GPA) and any college or other activities, including community volunteering. It is commonly recommended to attempt to keep your resume one page long, but this can be difficult. Try not to exceed two. Always update it when you gain new skills. You don’t need a new job to attain new knowledge. Examples include learning a new language or website coding in your now free time. These talents should be added on your resume.
  • Look for internships. Opportunities are often right under your nose. If you are having a hard time finding internships in your area, try to create one for yourself from a company in which you’d like to work. Internships are a great way to build experience that you can include on your newly updated resume. Even if you have a couple internships under your belt already from college, you may need to do more until an employer takes your bait.
  • Follow up with your connections. Throughout your college years, you’ve been exposed to connections you may not even realize you have. Reach out to old professors from your major to see if they can inform you of available positions.  If you completed any internships that did not lead to an employment opportunity, follow up with them to see if there are any openings or if they can provide you with a reference. Networking is a great way to find a new job without using a resume. Friends and families can also be a part of your job network. Be sure to ask for help as you continue the job hunt. Not to mention, you can check with your Alma mater’s career office to check on any upcoming opportunities.
  • Attend career fairs. Face to face interactions still prove to be effective. Being able to talk to potential employers in person is important so that you can ask questions, make a first impression and discover jobs that will match your skill set. Many colleges host these career fairs, but you don’t always need to be a college student to attend them. Check local community boards and websites to see what job fairs may be coming up in your area.
  • Be flexible. Jobs do not need to be black and white. If a company has room for growth or potential for you to utilize your degree, you should consider applying even for positions outside of your field. For example, if you are hoping to make it as a social media manager in a big corporate company, try applying for a front desk or assistant position first to try working your way up. Don’t worry if you do not get nor find that dream job after college; if they were easy to obtain, everyone would have a dream job.   A lot of people end up going with alternatives like an online criminal justice degree instead of attending brick and mortar institutions.
  • Don’t rely on one resource. There are multiple resources you can use when applying for jobs. Sites like Indeed.com as well as your local career center are just a couple examples. The more you are able to distribute your experience summary to potential jobs, the better your chances of landing one quickly after college.
  • Personalize your materials. You will have a better chance of standing out to employers if you personalize both your cover letters and resume to the job listing. Don’t talk about your gardening skills in the cover letter if the job is for writing English papers. Make sense?

One of the most important things to remember during the application process is  to keep applying. You may face rejection, but this is a normal part of the process and should be expected. Keep going anyway, even though it can be a daunting task. Stay positive and remember that every time you get your resume out, you are regularly exposing yourself to new opportunities. Practice makes perfect, and the more you apply, the closer you are to landing  that first job.

What tactics did you take when applying for your first job after college?

Are you really aware of an asset meaning?

Whether you are a numbers person or not, finances become a major part of your life as you continue to propel into adulthood. As you are consistently reminded of the importance of investments, it is also imperative to understand the difference between an asset and a liability, especially if you are making purchases with the intent to create value.

So, what is the definition and meaning of an asset?

According to Dictionary.com, an asset is “a single item of ownership having exchange value.” Google.com also defines it as “property owned by a person or company, regarded as having value and available to meet debts, commitments, or legacies.”

Of course, other definitions include a balance sheet for liabilities and capital as well as generalized to anything that is useful or valuable.

Robert Kiyosaki, American businessman, investor and self-help author, puts the description of the meaning of an asset a little more simply:

Asset Meaning

His examples include real estate, businesses that don’t require you to work at them, and stocks and bonds as mentioned in his book, “Rich Dad, Poor Dad.”

However, certain items you own can also be considered an asset, even within your own home.

Conversely, these same articles could be liabilities. Liabilities, as defined by Dictionary.com are “moneys owed; debts or pecuniary obligations.” Kiyosaki explains them as any purchase that takes money out of your pocket.

As you dive into the world of researching which of your household items put money in your pocket and which are a straight cost, you’ll need to keep these definitions in mind. A major issue is that many people believe their goods are profitable when, in reality, they are not as valuable as they think or, worse, they are a bit of a disadvantage to the consumer’s pocket.

While this can be an often confusing topic, Suburban Finance is here to help clear things up. Below are common possessions that you may not have realized were assets (or liabilities):

  • Your carSome will actually deem your vehicle a more of a liability due to the amount of expenses that go into them over time. These include gas, maintenance, insurance and a loan. A car can surely be an asset, though, if the value is greater than the amount due on it. It is also classified in such terms as it can be sold for cash; however, it continuously devalues over time, not excluding the minute you drive it off the lot. While you can add your automobile to your overall net worth, you have to also deduct the liabilities on it when doing so along with determining the depreciating value. (Equally, include all liabilities in your total net worth calculation.) Many dispute on this topic, but you need to be able to establish the worth of the vehicle (trade-in value, what you gain over time, etc.) and the expenses you will accrue.
  • Fine art. Art and other collectibles, such as antiques, can add a considerable amount to your net worth. Of course, this type of purchase does not come without research. The rarer a piece, the more valuable; but the art industry is also very erratic. This is not an easy money-maker, even though its value can be limitless. This can be also be an initial expensive investment on top of an ongoing venture, since purchasing the original will be worth more than a reproduction. If you already have some items that you believe to have value, whether a reproduction or not, you should invest to have them appraised. This will be the best way to ensure you have a strong asset in your hands. Furthermore, you should be aware of the fact that home owner’s insurance may not cover your collectibles without special coverage.
  • Furnishings and appliances. Furniture, appliances and even clothes are considered what is known as non-earning or non-financial assets. These are items you own but do not provide extra revenue. One could say that appliances could also be considered an earning asset due to their efficiency in saving you time, which creates more opportunities for you to make money. If you are purchasing certain goods with the intention of investing, such as antique furniture or collectible items, you will (as mentioned above) want to consider getting them evaluated for value. While most household goods won’t necessarily produce more income, they do still represent part of your net worth. They are also useful for cases of bankruptcy and replacement cost in your insurance policy.
  • Guns. Firearm purchases have been on the rise, particularly with the gun-control laws. These purchases include both collectibles and commercial. Many investors are anticipating tighter regulations in the near future while others are concerned of the return of the federal assault weapons ban, which means any firearms in the banned categories will be illegal to produce. Those in circulation will, though, still be able to purchased and exchange hands with a fixed supply level. These commodities are very valuable to each owner, and they tend to appreciate over time. Guns are an investment that has a price dependent upon supply and demand. While still a strong subject, guns are, indeed, considered an asset due to their steady worth. As with any asset, they would also need to be disclosed if ever filing bankruptcy.
  • Your homeWhile common thought is that your home would be measured as an asset, Kiyosaki actually considers this to be more a liability due to the time and expenses spent on maintenance, mortgage payments, insurance, the home’s devaluation and the like. It’s likely that you may not sell the home for what it is worth due to still owning on the loan when you move. Renting a room, though, can help to turn this non-earning asset into a financial gain. Also, purchasing homes with the intent to rent to others would also turn home-buying into an asset. This is, of course, depending on who you ask. In the business world, homes are typically considered more of a liability due to costs in time and money. In spite of this, most homeowners will think of their house as a strong resource due to owning the property.

In summary, what is considered an asset and liability is often debated and dependent upon whom you ask. Just remember to keep in mind financial trends and potential value in items before attempting to turn household products into money in your pocket.