How Much Does It Cost To Replace Car Keys?

How Much To Replace Car Keys

I used to lose my car keys fairly regularly. Even more often, I’d lock them inside the car. It was inconvenient, to say the least. But at the time, it wasn’t too expensive. Wondering how much it cost to replace car keys back in the 90’s? It was only a few dollars if I could get someone to take me to the hardware store where they could copy a spare key for me. If I had to get them to make a brand new key, rather than a copy, it was less than $100.

Replacing Lost Car Keys in the 20th Century

I gave copies of my keys to several friends and family members. That way, they could come help me out. If they weren’t available, then I’d have to get a new key made.

I do recall one awful time when I was out of town and had lost my car keys. I needed to call someone out to my car in the middle of nowhere so he could cut me a new key. It was snowing. The guy didn’t seem to know what he was doing. Therefore, the whole thing took hours.

I was sick, and cold, and frustrated. But, in the end, I got my new key and went on my way. Annoying, but simple enough. I don’t remember how much it cost to replace car keys that time but it was less than $100.

It Costs A Lot More to Replace Car Keys Today

Replacing car keys today isn’t as easy as it was back then. Take a look at your car keys and you’ll notice that they don’t look anything like the kind of key that you can just take to the hardware store and get copied. Instead, they are high-tech electronic keys. If you lose one, it could cost you several hundred dollars to replace it.

You don’t just pay to replace the key. You also have to pay for the electronic key fob. Moreover, you have to pay the dealer to reprogram the car so that it accepts the new key. Of course, all of this is designed to make your car convenient. It also makes it safer from theft. But it means that if you lose your keys, you’ll pay a pretty penny to replace them.

How Much to Replace Car Keys Depends on the Car

Back in 2013, Consumer Reports shared that the cost to replace a Toyota Prius key was about $600. That was the most expensive replacement on their list. BMW key replacement was closer to $500 while Lexus was less than $400 at the time. Meanwhile, the cost to replace a key for a 2005 Honda Accord was about $200. So, how much to replace car keys really depends a lot on the car and the type of key it uses.

Edmunds reported these average prices to replace car keys in 2019:

  • Basic transponder key: $160 (plus fob replacement adds another $75)
  • Switchblade keys: $70 (plus fob replacement adds another $75+)
  • All-in-one laser-cut keys: $150 – $250
  • Smart keys (AKA keyless entry remote): $220 – $500+ depending on vehicle

Notably, you can sometimes get a discount on replacement car keys. Work with your dealer to see if they’ll offer a lower price. Consumer Reports notes that you can get huge discounts if you buy replacement keys online. Of course, as with all shopping on the Internet, you buy at your own risk. Read that fine print before trying to save money that way. And remember that you’ll still need to get a locksmith to program the new key, which adds additional costs.

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Dave Banking App Review

Dave Banking App

Chances are that you’ve already heard of Dave, the personal finance app. However, did you know that there’s a new Dave Banking App? The new tool expands upon what the original app offered by provide a complete online-only banking solution.

What Is The Dave Banking App?

Dave Banking is a mobile bank geared specifically towards millennials, which is obvious from their website design. It implements some of the things that Dave was already known for and adds additional services. For example, you can set up an account with no monthly fees and no overdraft charges.

Dave Banking Benefits

Obviously, people who are concerned about overdraft charges will benefit from utilize this banking option. Here are some of the other benefits:

  • You can easily open an account by connecting your Dave banking app to your existing bank account. Alternatively, you can open your own brand new Dave checking account. There is no account minimum. You do not have to pass a credit check.
  • Dave has partnered with Credit Pop to offer a free credit-boosting service. The app reports your on-time rent and utility payments to the credit agencies. Therefore, you can improve your credit score by switching to this bank.
  • You get a $100 advance free of charge. There is no interest. In other words, if you run out of money, the account will help you without penalty.
  • Dave accepts direct deposits from tens of thousands of different employers.
  • The account is FDIC-insured. Therefore your money is protected as it would be with any other regular bank.

Budgeting Help and Predictive Account Info

The Dave Banking App offers some key benefits that many other regular banks simply don’t provide. For one thing, the tool gives you automatic budgeting help. You can easily use the app to see what you regularly earn and spend, plan for upcoming big expenses, and get other assistance with keeping to your budget.

Moreover, the app has a built in Artificial Intelligence tools. This helps predict your account balance before your next paycheck. Whenever it looks like you’re at risk of going empty in your bank account, you’ll receive an alert. Of course, you can rely on that $100 no-interest cash advance if you do go empty. But this AI and budgeting information helps you avoid that problem.

Dave Banking App Helps You Find a Side Job

This is another really unique featuring of banking with Dave. After all, when was the last time that your regular bank offered to help you find work? Dave has partnered with gig economy / sharing economy companies to help you find local work whenever you need extra money. You can apply for jobs directly through the Dave Banking App. It’s one of the most unique cutting-edge tools for a mobile bank to offer. And although it’s geared towards millennials, people of all generations can take advantage of earning a side income with a new gig.

Important Things To Know

Here are a few key things you’ll want to know before you choose this tool:

  • The Dave Banking App is available on Google Play and in the Apple Store.
  • You can tip the app and for every 1% that you tip Dave will plant a tree.
  • It costs $1 per month to bank with Dave.
  • This is a checking account, not a savings account, so you won’t earn interest on your money.

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Pros and Cons of Taking Early Social Security

early social security

You can begin taking early social security payments as young as age 62. Most people start taking it around age 66. Some people believe that you should wait until age 70 if you’re in a position to do so. What’s the right answer? It’s hard to say. There are some big pros and cons to taking that money early. Understanding those can help you make the right decision for your own retirement.

What Happens When You Take Early Social Security?

Generally speaking, you’re able to get your “full retirement” when you reach around age 66. (This varies slightly depending on individual circumstances.) If you take that money early, then you don’t get the full amount. Therefore, your monthly Social Security payments are lower than they would be if you waited.

On the other hand, you start to receive that money sooner. If you reach age 62 and really need that Social Security income, then you might find that it’s worth it to take the lower monthly amount. You’ll start getting that monthly check years before you would if you waited until reaching full retirement age.

So, in terms of the most basic pros and cons, taking your money earlier means:

  • The benefit is that you start receiving your money sooner.
  • The drawback is that you get less money per month throughout your retirement.

Social Security May Change in 2035

The Motley Fool makes a great case for taking early Social Security, which is that big changes may await when it comes to social security. In fact, Congress may cut benefits by 23% for all people receiving social security from that point forward. Therefore, if you’re thinking about retiring between now and then, it might be worth it to take the money early.

Yes, you’ll get less per month when you do that. However, you’ll earn the full “lesser” amount every year up until 2035. The longer you wait to start taking payments, the less time you have to accrue money before that potentially huge Social Security cut.

Of course, we don’t actually know for sure what decision Congress will make. There’s a chance that they won’t make that cut. Or it might not be as big. Therefore, taking early Social Security is a risk. You may opt for the lesser monthly amount now, hoping to accrue more before the big cut, only to find out that the big cut doesn’t happen. You’ll still get the lesser monthly amount. It’s not like you can go backwards in time and “take back” your decision to take early Social Security.

So, taking the money early means:

  • You might get more money overall by cashing out as early as possible before a big cut.
  • If the big cut doesn’t happen, then you might not have made as much as you potentially could have.

We Don’t Know How Long We Will Live

If you had a crystal ball then it might be easier to decide when to take your money. If at age 62 you knew that you only had ten years left to live, then obviously you would take early Social Security. On the other hand, if you knew that you were going to live another thirty years, then you might opt to keep on working until you could completely max out that retirement income.

Unfortunately, there’s no way to know. So the pros and cons really depend on factors that we can’t entirely know or control. All that you can do is make the best decision possible with the information that you have as you reach retirement age. Consider your health and likely longevity based on family history and other factors. Think about how much money you’ll likely get if you take early Social Security vs. the full amount. Weigh what would happen if Congress cut that amount in 2035. Then do your best to decide how the pros and cons balance out.

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