Can You Imagine If You Never Retire? 1 in 4 Think That’s That Their Fate.

never retire

Many people are planning ahead for early retirement. However, that’s not the full picture of the American public. Despite the fact that lots of us think about retiring in our thirties, forties, or fifties, there are also plenty of people who don’t plan to retire early. In fact, according to one survey, one in four people think they may never retire.

People Who Think They’ll Never Retire

Twenty-three percent of those surveyed believe that they will never retire. 80% of those people were under the age of 50 at the time of the survey. That leaves 20% that were age 50 or older and couldn’t see retirement in their future.

The main reason that people assume that they’ll never retire is that they don’t think that they’ll be able to afford to stop working. They don’t have enough money set aside in savings or retirement funds. They still have bills to pay. Many don’t even own the home that they live in.

Plus, as people get older, they need more medical care. If they don’t trust that Medicare will cover their needs, then they may feel like they have to keep working. They figure they’ll just work until they die.

People Who Plan To Work Longer

There are plenty of people who think it’s unreasonable to assume they’ll never retire. However, they believe that they’ll keep working into their older years. Twenty-three percent of those surveyed believed that they would keep working past the age of 65, which is often considered “normal” retirement age.

Therefore, nearly half of those surveyed believed that they will never retire or that, if they do, it’ll be after age 65. Another 19% say they’ll retire at 65. Many people are are living longer and longer, which means a lot of years after age 65 during which they have to support themselves. If they don’t have enough money in savings then it may make more sense to keep working than to retire at or before 65. Approximately 20% of people age 65 and older in America are currently working or looking for a job.

Elderly People Are Often Forced to Stop Working

Unfortunately, the reality is that a lot of elderly people do stop working, even if they don’t wish to do so. They may think that they’ll never retire but then life happens. Circumstances conspire against them. They get injured or ill and can’t keep working. They get laid off and have trouble finding new work in a market that’s biased towards hiring younger people. Or perhaps they find themselves having to do caregiving for an elderly spouse. Whatever the reason, they end up retiring, even if they aren’t financially prepared to do so.

People Don’t Feel Ready for Retirement

Regardless of when they expect to retire, most people don’t seem to feel prepared for it. 45% of those surveyed said that they are not at all prepared for retirement. Another 33% said that they are only somewhat prepared. The good news is that younger people recognize that they aren’t prepared and people who are getting closer to retirement age feel a little bit more ready for that reality. Still, nearly one third of people over age 50 said that they are not at all prepared for retirement.

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Gig Economy: Which Generation Is Doing The Gig Work?

gig economy

Recently a news report has been making the rounds about how baby boomers are the generation making the most as workers of the gig economy. However, the report was based entirely on one company’s workers. Therefore, I got curious and wanted to dig deeper into this.

Are Baby Boomers Doing Best in the Gig Economy?

The Mercury News was just one of many sources that shared the news recently that baby boomers are thriving in the gig economy. Based on this report, baby boomers:

  • Took the most gigs
  • Earned the highest ratings from customers
  • Tend to do more of the physical labor jobs rather than admin work
  • Made the most money, out-earning millennials by $200+ monthly

The information comes from Wonolo, a company that gig workers can use to find jobs. The report revealed that workers range in age from 18 – 80+.

Why Baby Boomers May Thrive as Gig Economy Workers

If it’s true that baby boomers are the generation thriving most in the gig economy, then what’s causing that? There could be a any number of reasons.

First of all, if you’re Baby Boomer age and looking for work then perhaps you’re very motivated. Maybe you lost your job recently and find it hard to get new traditional work because of persistent ageism. Or perhaps you’re struggling as you support both your adult children and your elderly parents, so you have to take on extra gigs. Either way, you’re motivated to work a lot and earn as much as possible.

However, there could be more to it than that. Some suggestions in The Mercury News article include:

  • Maturity leads to a stronger work ethic and willingness to put in the effort
  • Experience means that you’re able to do the work effectively and efficiently
  • Baby boomers as a whole may be more reliable workers
  • After working other jobs for years, they find the work particularly enjoyable, so they put in the effort
  • With more experience, they may be able to command higher prices even in the gig economy

Are More Millennials Working in the Gig Economy?

The recent report indicates that Baby Boomers are doing better than other generations in the gig economy. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that they make up a majority of the side hustle workforce. CBS News reports that nearly half of all working millennials have engaged in gig work for extra income. In contrast, less than 40% of Gen X and barely more than one quarter of Baby Boomers have taken gigs.

Gig Economy Differences Between the Generations

Members of Gen Z, Gen X, Millennials, and Baby Boomers are participate in the gig economy. Therefore, the question might not be who is doing the work but rather what’s the difference between their experiences. Fortune reports on twokey findings:

  • Baby Boomers often take gig jobs for better work-family balance. In contrast, younger generations seek to make more money with gigs as a “second job.”
  • Baby Boomers are most affected by, and worried about, the lack of benefits that come with working in the gig economy.

Deloitte Insights adds some additional information:

  • Millennials in the gig economy often rely on others (such as parents) to help pay some of their expenses. Those who choose the gig economy over a traditional job (instead of in addition to it as a side income) make less than their full-time employed peers.
  • Whereas Baby Boomers tend to get physical gig jobs, millennials often get jobs in admin and the arts. That said, maintenance is also high on the millennial gig list.

It’s also important to recognize that there are many different types of gig work. Some people participate mostly in the sharing economy (driving for Lyft, for example). In contrast, others take contract work in offices or do freelance jobs. The generations may vary in their job choices as well as their reasons for joining the gig economy.

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Want to Retire Early? Be Aware of These 5 Financial Risks.

early retirement

Many people want to take early retirement. If you’ve saved up enough money then why not? Well, first of all, you have to be sure that you’ve saved up enough money. Many people think that they have planned accordingly only to realize that there are a lot of financial downsides to early retirement.

Here are five of the biggest money problems that people tend to face in early retirement:

1. Failing to Plan Properly for Taxes

Did you know that many people are in a higher tax bracket at retirement than for much of their working career? This means that you’re likely to owe more at tax time than you’re accustomed to. Moreover, once you start taking out your 401K money, you’ll have to pay taxes on that.

Therefore, taxes in retirement can be pricey. If you haven’t planned ahead, then you’re going to have to readjust for that reality. If you retire early, then you’ll have to start figuring that out years ahead of your peers.

2. Years and Years of Spending Ahead

That brings us to the next key point. If you retire early then chances are that you’ll have more years of retirement. Therefore, you’ll have to make your retirement income stretch. If you retire at 55 instead of 65, that’s ten less years of earning and ten more years relying on retirement income.

3. Where Will Your Money Come From?

You won’t even be able to access some of your retirement funds, such as your 401K, until you hit a certain age. Therefore, you’ll have to figure out where you’re money is going to come from prior to that. If you haven’t planned in advance, then you can easily find yourself overspending in those early years. If you tap into your savings or refinance your home to cover those costs then you’ll have to find some way to make up for it later.

4. What About Healthcare?

Just because you retire early doesn’t mean that you can access Medicaid early. Therefore, you’re going to have to figure out how to pay for health insurance until you reach regular retirement age. If you’re not working anymore then you can’t count on employer rates. Your health insurance could get very expensive very quickly.

Even though you’ve retired early, you’re old enough that you can’t risk going without healthcare. If anything were to happen, your care costs would be exorbitant. Therefore, you do have to pay out of pocket for health insurance. How are you planning to do that if you’ve retired early?

5. You Don’t Maximize Your Retirement Benefits

If you take early retirement then you may not make as much money post-retirement as you could have. For example, if you have a job that pays a pension, the pension amount might be significantly lower if you retire early. Likewise, if you start access Social Security early (“early” currently means age 62) then you won’t get as much as if you’d waited. So, you start using the money sooner and yet you’re getting less of it than you could have. Waiting to retire could be well worth it.

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