Dyson V7 vs V8: Which is the Better Buy?

dyson v7 vs v8

If you want to get a new vacuum cleaner, then Dyson may be the way to go. In fact, you might have narrowed it down to the Dyson V7 or V8. Which one is the better buy? Obviously, the Dyson V8 is newer. Therefore, it might have some better features, but it also might be more expensive. Is it worth the extra cost?

Dyson V7 vs V8: First, the Similarities

These are both cordless vacuums. They’re both made by Dyson. Moreover, they are both designed to be an improvement over the earlier Dyson V6. Therefore, there are a lot of similarities between Dyson V7 vs V8. If you’re just looking for a basic cordless vacuum that has excellent power, then you could do well to get either one of them.

Both vacuums are similar in terms of body design. Each has a suction trigger as well as a max mode for more power. Both can be used as a stick vacuum or in a handheld mode. They can both clean hardwood floors as well as carpets. While the Dyson V7 has significantly improved battery life when compared to the V6, it’s not significantly different than the V8 battery life.

If you aren’t that particular, then there is no significant reason to spend the extra money to get the Dyson V8. They’re similar enough to one another that the lower price of the V7 is a good reason to go for that one.

Don’t Compare Apples to Oranges

One of the most important things to understand when comparing Dyson V7 vs V8 is that there are different versions of each of these vacuums. For example, you can get the Dyson D7 Motorhead, which is the basic version, or you can get the Dyson V7 Total Clean, which has a soft roller for hardwood floors (among other advanced features). Make sure that when you compare Dyson V7 vs V8 that you’re comparing the same versions of them. In other words, you can’t comprae the Dyson D7 Motorhead to the Dyson V8 Total Clean. You have to compare “apples to apples.”

Dyson V7 Animal vs Dyson V8 Absolute

One of the most common comparisons that people make when determining which of these vacuums to buy is the Dyson V7 Animal vs. the Dyson V8 Absolute. These have more features than the basic V7 Motorhead version described above. They are fairly comparable to one another and give you a good sense if one is better than the other for your needs.

The Dyson V8 Absolute:

  • Is more powerful
  • Has slightly longer battery power but also takes longer to recharge
  • Is a slightly heavier vacuum
  • Has a better filtration system
  • Costs more

The Dyson V7 can meet the average household’s needs. However, if you require more power than normal from your vacuum’s suction, then you might find it worth it to invest in the V8. Moreover, the filtration system on the V8 is better so if you struggle with significant allergies then you might find it worth it to pay more for the V8.

Dyson V8 vs V10

You can also take a look at the Dyson V10. It’s got slightly more suction power than the Dyson V8. It also has a larger dustbin. However, it’s not noticeably better in other ways. It’s also significantly more expensive. Nevertheless, it’s worth a look if you’re doing a comparison.

Read More:

How Do I Split Bills in a Blended Family?

split bills in a blended family

When two families come together to form one, there’s more to manage than just the wedding and living arrangement. Both parents likely have their own financial obligations, and you’ll need to split mutual expenses.

Often, figuring out how to split bills in a blended family requires some thought. Not every situation makes a 50/50 arrangement appropriate, so you need to examine yours to find a plan that works. Continue reading

How to Get Your Spouse on Board with Saving More

spouse

It’s no secret that finances are a touchy subject in relationships, and I’ve talked about this before here on Suburban Finance. But, one of the best ways to prevent issues is to be very open and honest about money in the household. How do you do that, though, if you have a hard time getting your spouse on board with a budget?

When my beau and I moved in together four years ago, we had to talk about all the unexciting (but important!) stuff like who is going to handle what bills, how we would split the rent and so on. As our relationship and lives have evolved, we have had to revisit this conversation over the years.

Ryan made the decision to go to medical school, a decision of which I am very proud and supportive; however, this means our spending habits have to change. Between the two of us, I am typically the one always thinking of ways to save. I had to get him on the frugal life bandwagon as well so that we will have less to worry about once he is in school full-time.

He may not be my official spouse yet, but here are a few do’s and don’ts on how to keep the money conversation from turning into a war:

Don’t be controlling

Household decisions need to be made together, not forced upon one another. Everything Ryan and I do, we try to make it a team effort. Money decisions are no different. Over the last seven and a half years, we’ve learned that the way we view money and saving do differ. So, try to pick ways to save that work for each other instead of against each other. Ultimately, you only have control over yourself. You can encourage change, but the more you push, the more resistance (or resentment) you may get. Realizing this first is the initial step.

Do set aside time for the conversation

Conversations involving finances in the home should not be rushed. Set aside time with your wife or husband to discuss one another’s financial goals. Be understanding of your spouse and their point of view as you try to explain your own.

For me, I mentioned wanting to use money we would have spent on ordering food three weeks in a row on a nice (much needed) date night out. Ryan agreed, and so he is much more conscious of this before dialing the phone for take out. This is just one real-life example of many, but I began my own conversation with bringing up this point as well as the amount spent and how it could be better used in our lives.

What might work for you is trying to find that common ground of things you may want to do together but can’t due to other financial obligations. Working together to find ways to accomplish those things is so rewarding in so many ways. Perhaps your matching goals are as simple as wanting to pay off your credit card debt within the year. This is a great starting point in developing a savings plan together.

Don’t judge your spouse’s spending habits

Ryan has a lot of outdoor hobbies, so he often likes to spend his extra cash on items for his mountain bike or new running shoes. My current spending habits are very focused on my business as well as updating our home. If either of us judged the other for how we spend our money, it would put an extra strain on our relationship.

If you want to make changes, start with yourself. Then, you can bring this up in casual conversations as follow-ups from your previous money discussion, such as:

  • “So, I decided not to buy all those new clothes and put that money in my retirement fund instead.”
  • “I’m doing this thing where any time I want to buy coffee out, I put that money into our travel savings instead. I was hoping we might be able to do that weekend getaway in the mountains we’ve been talking about.”

As mentioned in point number one, don’t try to force actions; encourage them.

Do be open and honest

If you are finding that you still have a hard time getting your spouse on board, it’s time to get a little more straight forward. Bring up the household expenses and income and go over the numbers in more detail together. Show your husband or wife why you are concerned and ask for his or her input on suggestions for change. Of course, you can discuss your own ideas, but again, finances should be a team effort; therefore, you really need to focus on gaining their insight on the situation as well. Find out their concerns and work it out together.

This may be a good time to call on an expert. Your expert of choice does not have to be a therapist. You can simply look to a financial professional and/or purchase a well-received book regarding money saving tips and building wealth. Ask your significant other to read it as well. When you are on the road together, you can download an Audible version to ensure you are both absorbing the information together. Personally, I recommend Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki.

Usually, what I have found works best (and what seems to also work best for my friends and family) is simply showing the numbers. There are a lot of great apps out there to help calculate where you are spending your money the most, like Mint.com, but I typically just refer to my online banking account, which does this for me as well. Choose what works best for you.

Household budgeting is no easy task, and it can take just as much as work as your relationship, I have found. It seems the biggest issues is just not knowing how much money is being wasted. But, realizing one another’s goals and expressing interest in achieving them together has proven successful for me and my relationship. If your spouse knows how important it is for you to not only see your own savings goals met but his or hers, you’ll find saving to actually be pretty fun and exciting.

Is this a challenge you have faced? What has worked for you?